Reviewers are now allowed to give their impressions of Call of Duty: Ghosts on Xbox One. Microsoft had set an embargo on reviewers till today.

Here’s a roundup:

The two versions look nearly identical. Viewing the Xbox One release next to the PS4 , I had difficulty telling them apart. It’s possible that the PS4 version looked somewhat sharper, but that may have just been my imagination after confirming the hard resolution difference. The next-gen releases of Call of Duty: Ghosts are so close together that gun to my head, I’d have no confidence in being able to discern which version was which — at least, while the two are standing still.

The Xbox One release’s framerate was far more noticeable. As mentioned in the initial review, Call of Duty: Ghosts suffers from consistent framerate drops on the PS4, especially during multiplayer when action got especially hectic. The Xbox One version suffered no such drops, maintaining a steady 60 frames per second throughout.

When comparing the PS4 and Xbox One versions side-by-side, there’s little to no variation in textures and effects, but there is a discernible difference in resolution. While both are displayed at 1080p, the Xbox One version upscales the game from 720p resolution. In contrast, the PS4 version runs natively at 1080p, which makes character models, weapons, and environments look noticeably sharper and more detailed. The difference is especially apparent on larger-sized TVs, where pixel density weighs more heavily in picture quality.

It’s certainly going to be a sticking point for those who demand the highest fidelity experience, but the difference is harder to identify in absence of a side-by-side comparison.

Oddly, the Xbox One version makes no use of the haptic feedback motors built into the controller’s triggers, and the DualShock 4’s trackpad is used solely as a button to toggle the in-game scoreboard during multiplayer.